Radiology
Study shows potential for using ultrasound to detect early signs of preterm labour

Study shows potential for using ultrasound to detect early signs of preterm labour

Washington: Researchers from North Carolina State University, Institut Langevin and Paris-Descartes University have conducted a proof-of-concept study that raises the possibility of using ultrasound techniques to detect cervical stiffness changes that indicate an increased risk of preterm labour in pregnant women. more

New method could detect blood clots anywhere in the body with a single scan

New method could detect blood clots anywhere in the body with a single scan

Washington: A blood clot is a dangerous health situation with the potential to trigger heart attacks, strokes and other medical emergencies. To treat a blood clot, doctors need to find its exact location. But current clinical techniques can only look at one part of the body at a time, slowing treatment and increasing the risk for complications. Now, researchers are reporting a method, tested in rats, that may someday allow healthcare providers to quickly scan the entire body for a blood clot. more

New contrast agent spotlights tiny tumours and micrometastases

New contrast agent spotlights tiny tumours and micrometastases

Washington: Researchers at Case Western Reserve University have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent that detects much smaller aggressive breast cancer tumours and micrometastases than current agents can identify. more

Shorter course of radiation therapy associated with less toxicity in women with early stage breast cancer

Shorter course of radiation therapy associated with less toxicity in women with early stage breast cancer

Washington: Women who receive a shorter course of whole breast radiation therapy for early stage disease experience less toxicity and improved quality of life compared to those who undergo a longer course of treatment, researchers report from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre. more

Ultrasound accelerates skin healing – especially for diabetics and the elderly

Ultrasound accelerates skin healing – especially for diabetics and the elderly

London: Healing times for skin ulcers and bedsores can be reduced by a third with the use of low-intensity ultrasound, scientists from the University of Sheffield and University of Bristol have found. more

New imaging technique could make brain tumour removal safer, more effective, study suggests

New imaging technique could make brain tumour removal safer, more effective, study suggests

New York: Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumour, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. Now Johns Hopkins researchers report they have developed an imaging technology that could provide surgeons with a color-coded map of a patient’s brain showing which areas are and are not cancer. more

New imaging method spots liver cancer at early stage

New imaging method spots liver cancer at early stage

New York (IANS): US researchers have developed a new imaging method that can detect liver cancer and other liver diseases at an earlier stage than what current leading methods can, reports a new study. more

Effective radiotherapy for lung cancer comes a step closer

Effective radiotherapy for lung cancer comes a step closer

London (IANS): Researchers have developed a method that could help apply a more effective form of radiotherapy even on diseased mobile organs such as the lung. more

Smartphone-based device could provide rapid, low-cost molecular tumour diagnosis

Smartphone-based device could provide rapid, low-cost molecular tumour diagnosis

Washington: A device developed by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators may bring rapid, accurate molecular diagnosis of tumours and other diseases to locations lacking the latest medical technology. more

MRI based on a sugar molecule can tell cancerous from noncancerous cells

MRI based on a sugar molecule can tell cancerous from noncancerous cells

Washington: Imaging tests like mammograms or CT scans can detect tumours, but figuring out whether a growth is or isn’t cancer usually requires a biopsy to study cells directly. Now results of a Johns Hopkins study suggest that MRI could one day make biopsies more effective or even replace them altogether by noninvasively detecting tell-tale sugar molecules shed by the outer membranes of cancerous cells. more