Pharmacology
Study suggests new approach to treating HIV

Study suggests new approach to treating HIV

Washington: A team of researchers based at Johns Hopkins Medicine has decoded a system that makes certain types of immune cells impervious to HIV infection. The system’s two vital components are high levels of a molecule that becomes embedded in viral DNA like a code written in invisible ink, and an enzyme that, when it reads the code, switches from repairing the DNA to chopping it up into unusable pieces. The researchers, who report the find in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, say the discovery points toward a new approach to eradicating HIV from the body. more

Trapping malaria parasites inside host blood cell forms basis for new class of drugs

Trapping malaria parasites inside host blood cell forms basis for new class of drugs

Washington: One of the most insidious ways that parasitic diseases such as malaria and toxoplasmosis wreak their havoc is by hijacking their host’s natural cellular processes, turning self against self. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania and Johns Hopkins University, led by Doron Greenbaum, assistant professor of pharmacology at Penn, have identified the cell signalling pathway used by these parasites to escape from and destroy their host cells and infect new cells — pointing the way toward possible new strategies to stop these diseases in their tracks. The study appears in Cell, Host and Microbe. more

Researchers make breakthrough in arthritis research

Researchers make breakthrough in arthritis research

Toronto: Researchers at Western University have made a breakthrough that could lead to a better understanding of a common form of arthritis that, until now, has eluded scientists. more

HIV drug efavirenz may cause memory declines

HIV drug efavirenz may cause memory declines

Washington: The way the body metabolizes a commonly prescribed anti-retroviral drug that is used long term by patients infected with HIV may contribute to cognitive impairment by damaging nerve cells, a Johns Hopkins research suggests. more

Clinical trial evaluates synthetic cannabinoid as brain cancer treatment

Clinical trial evaluates synthetic cannabinoid as brain cancer treatment

Washington: Researchers at University of California, San Diego Moores Cancer Centre are evaluating the safety and tolerability of a synthetic cannabinoid called dexanabinol (ETS2101). Delivered as a weekly intravenous infusion, the drug is being tested in patients with all forms of brain cancer, both primary and metastatic. more