Neurosurgery
Wireless, dissolvable sensors to soon monitor brain

Wireless, dissolvable sensors to soon monitor brain

Washington: A team of neurosurgeons and engineers has developed wireless brain sensors that monitor pressure and temperature inside the brain and then are absorbed by the body so that there is no need for surgery to remove the devices. more

New imaging technique could make brain tumour removal safer, more effective, study suggests

New imaging technique could make brain tumour removal safer, more effective, study suggests

New York: Brain surgery is famously difficult for good reason: When removing a tumour, for example, neurosurgeons walk a tightrope as they try to take out as much of the cancer as possible while keeping crucial brain tissue intact — and visually distinguishing the two is often impossible. Now Johns Hopkins researchers report they have developed an imaging technology that could provide surgeons with a color-coded map of a patient’s brain showing which areas are and are not cancer. more

Migraine surgery found effective among teens

Migraine surgery found effective among teens

Washington (IANS): Migraine surgery is effective among selected adolescent patients that don’t respond to standard treatment, a recent study shows. more

AIIMS doctors develop novel surgical procedure to treat epilepsy

AIIMS doctors develop novel surgical procedure to treat epilepsy

New Delhi: Doctors at All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, have developed a novel and minimally invasive endoscopy-assisted surgical procedure to treat epilepsy. more

Brain surgery through the cheek

Brain surgery through the cheek

Washington: For those most severely affected, treating epilepsy means drilling through the skull deep into the brain to destroy the small area where the seizures originate – invasive, dangerous and with a long recovery period. more

New method to restore skull after brain surgery reduces complication rates

New method to restore skull after brain surgery reduces complication rates

Washington: Johns Hopkins surgeons report they have devised a better, safer method to replace bone removed from the skull after lifesaving brain surgery. The new technique, they say, appears to result in fewer complications than standard restoration, which has changed little since its development in the 1890s. more

New technique for deep brain stimulation surgery proves accurate and safe

New technique for deep brain stimulation surgery proves accurate and safe

Washington: The surgeon who more than two decades ago pioneered deep brain stimulation surgery in the United States to treat people with Parkinson’s disease and other movement disorders has now developed a new way to perform the surgery — which allows for more accurate placement of the brain electrodes and likely is safer for patients. more

Brain haemorrhage patients offered better treatment

Brain haemorrhage patients offered better treatment

London: Surgeons now have a formula to predict when brain haemorrhage patients need surgery, thanks to an international trial led by Newcastle University. more

Researchers report ‘sensational success’ in patients with major depression

Researchers report ‘sensational success’ in patients with major depression

Berlin: Researchers from the Bonn University Hospital implanted pacemaker electrodes into the medial forebrain bundle in the brains of patients suffering from major depression with amazing results: In six out of seven patients, symptoms improved both considerably and rapidly. more

Tiny, ultra-flexible electrodes may help treat Parkinson’s

Tiny, ultra-flexible electrodes may help treat Parkinson’s

Berne: Some 90,000 patients per year are treated for Parkinson’s disease, a number that is expected to rise by 25 per cent annually. Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), which consists of electrically stimulating the central or peripheral nervous system, is currently standard practice for treating Parkinson’s, but it can involve long, expensive surgeries with dramatic side effects. Miniature, ultra-flexible electrodes developed in Switzerland, however, could be the answer to more successful treatment for this and a host of other health issues. more