Medicine
Safety concerns linger for generic oncology drugs in developing countries

Safety concerns linger for generic oncology drugs in developing countries

Washington: Although generic oncology drugs can reduce patient costs and improve treatment access, the safety of these drugs in developing countries is uncertain, according to an international research team led by Dr Charles Bennett, Josie M Fletcher professor and chairman of the S C SmartState Centre in Medication Safety and Efficacy at the College of Pharmacy at the University of South Carolina. more

Pharmaceutical industry-sponsored meals associated with higher prescribing rates

Pharmaceutical industry-sponsored meals associated with higher prescribing rates

Washington: Accepting a single pharmaceutical industry-sponsored meal was associated with higher rates of prescribing certain drugs to Medicare patients by physicians, with more, and costlier, meals associated with greater increases in prescribing, according to an article published by JAMA Internal Medicine. more

Researchers combine drugs to develop a new treatment for human parainfluenza virus

Researchers combine drugs to develop a new treatment for human parainfluenza virus

Sydney: Griffith’s Institute for Glycomics has made a promising discovery in the treatment and prevention of human parainfluenza virus. more

Common painkillers are more dangerous than we think

Common painkillers are more dangerous than we think

London: Many people are prescribed NSAIDs for the treatment of painful conditions, fever and inflammation. But the treatment also comes with side effects, including the risk of ulcers and increased blood pressure. more

Stronger evidence found for link between prenatal exposure to paracetamol and the risk of developing asthma

Stronger evidence found for link between prenatal exposure to paracetamol and the risk of developing asthma

London: Researchers have provided new evidence that developing asthma can be linked to pregnant women and infants being exposed to paracetamol; by testing that the association was not simply due to the medical complaint for which the person is taking paracetamol. The findings were published in the International Journal of Epidemiology. more

US scientists document trajectory of Zika virus for first time

US scientists document trajectory of Zika virus for first time

New York: A team of US researchers has documented for the first time the disease trajectory of Zika virus that started with nine positive patients and has now spread to more than 13,000 infected individuals in Colombia. more

‘Hunger hormone’ may treat artery disease

‘Hunger hormone’ may treat artery disease

London: The appetite-regulating hormone ghrelin could be used to treat an advanced form of peripheral artery disease characterised by pain at rest, non-healing ulcers, and gangrene, say researchers, including one of Indian-origin. more

Reduced antibiotic prescription lowers patient satisfaction

Reduced antibiotic prescription lowers patient satisfaction

London: Reduced antibiotic prescribing by doctors is associated with lower patient satisfaction, a Britain-based survey shows. more

New antibodies to treat whooping cough in infants

New antibodies to treat whooping cough in infants

New York: Researchers have developed two antibodies to potentially treat or prevent pertussis, the highly contagious respiratory tract infection that affects millions of infants and results in an estimated 200,000 child deaths every year. more

Daily antibiotics may prevent drug-resistant TB

Daily antibiotics may prevent drug-resistant TB

New York: Prescribing antibiotic doses once or twice a week for tuberculosis (TB) treatment are more likely to lead to drug resistant strains than daily antibiotic regimens, new research has found. more