RESEARCH
Scientists suggest new approach unravelling aetiology and possible reversal of complex psychiatric disorders

Scientists suggest new approach unravelling aetiology and possible reversal of complex psychiatric disorders

New Delhi: Aetiology of the complex psychiatric disorders remains elusive owing to unapproachability of intricate neural circuits in living human. Indian scientists have published a study in the journal ‘Neurology, Psychiatry and Brain Research’ proposing the possible use of an emerging advanced neuroscience research technique optogenetics in transgenic zebrafish model for understanding genesis, progression and possible reversal of various psychiatric disorders. more

AIIMS scientists describe new type of diabetes afflicting the brain

AIIMS scientists describe new type of diabetes afflicting the brain

New Delhi: In a groundbreaking study, scientists at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi have described a new type of diabetes they term as “Diabetes Type 4”. more

New malaria vaccine found effective in clinical trial

New malaria vaccine found effective in clinical trial

Berlin: The University of Tubingen researchers in collaboration with the biotech company Sanaria Inc have demonstrated in a clinical trial that a new vaccine for malaria called Sanaria PfSPZ-CVac has been up to 100 percent effective when assessed at 10 weeks after last dose of vaccine. more

New research may lead to non-surgical cataract treatment

New research may lead to non-surgical cataract treatment

Washington: The University of Massachusetts Amherst recently licensed a new technology to Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc that holds promise of revolutionizing the treatment of cataracts and presbyopia, based on early phase discoveries by polymer physicist Murugappan Muthukumar and former graduate student Ben Mohr regarding the fundamental science of proteins in the lens of the human eye. more

New dental implant with built-in reservoir reduces risk of infections

New dental implant with built-in reservoir reduces risk of infections

London: A multidisciplinary team of researchers at KU Leuven (University of Leuven, Belgium) has developed a dental implant that gradually releases drugs from a built-in reservoir. This helps prevent and fight infections. more

Soft robots hug the heart to help pump blood

Soft robots hug the heart to help pump blood

Washington: An implantable soft-robotic device could help failing hearts pump blood by giving the organ gentle squeezes, mimicking the natural motion of cardiac muscle, a new study reveals. more

94% of white coats used in hospitals contaminated by dangerous bacteria and fungus: Study

94% of white coats used in hospitals contaminated by dangerous bacteria and fungus: Study

Hyderabad: A study, published in the International Journal of Research in Medical Sciences, says that 94% of white coats worn by doctors and other staff in hospitals are contaminated by dangerous bacteria and fungus like Aspergillus, which lead to nosocomial (hospital-acquired) infections. more

Vaccine shows promising results for early-stage breast cancer patients

Vaccine shows promising results for early-stage breast cancer patients

Washington: Deregulation and inhibition of the immune system contributes to cancer development. Many therapeutic strategies aim to re-stimulate the immune system to recognize cancer cells and target them for destruction. more

Financial penalties help in reducing hospital readmissions

Financial penalties help in reducing hospital readmissions

Washington: Hospitals that were financially penalized for too many readmissions were more likely than non-penalized institutions to subsequently reduce readmissions for all conditions, according to a new study by more

Reducing antibiotic duration does more harm than good for ear infections in young children

Reducing antibiotic duration does more harm than good for ear infections in young children

Pittsburgh (US): In a trial conducted at Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Centre (UPMC) and the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, researchers have demonstrated that when treating children between 9 and 23 months of age with antibiotics for ear infections, a shortened course has worse clinical outcomes without reducing the risk of antibiotic resistance or adverse events. more