Simple saliva test may help clinicians diagnose kidney disease

Sunday, November 20, 2016

Washington: A simple saliva test may be helpful for diagnosing kidney disease, especially in developing countries. The technology will be highlighted at ASN Kidney Week 2016 November 15-20 at McCormick Place in Chicago, Illinois.

Dr Viviane Calice-Silva

Dr Viviane Calice-Silva

Simple and inexpensive tools for the diagnosis of kidney disease are lacking. Dr Viviane Calice-Silva of Pro-Kidney Foundation, Brazil and her colleagues evaluated the diagnostic performance of a salivary urea nitrogen (SUN) dipstick, in Malawi, a low resource country in Africa.

Among 742 individuals who were studied, investigators diagnosed 146 patients with kidney disease using standard tests. High SUN levels were associated not only with the standard diagnostic tests, but also with a higher risk of early death.

“Our data suggest that SUN can improve the detection of kidney disease, increasing the awareness to this devastating complication,” said Dr Calice-Silva. “Also, higher awareness and detection of kidney disease in low resource settings may increase the number of patients who are diagnosed and referred, therefore providing appropriate treatment and improving outcomes.”

ASN (American Society of Nephrology) Kidney Week 2016, the largest nephrology meeting of its kind, will provide a forum for more than 13,000 professionals to discuss the latest findings in kidney health research and engage in educational sessions related to advances in the care of patients with kidney and related disorders.

Categories: Nephrology, Pathology, RESEARCH

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